WVU, community groups to host screening of ‘Heroin(e)’ documentary and discussion on opioid epidemic

WVU, community groups to host screening of ‘Heroin(e)’ documentary and discussion on opioid epidemic

Several West Virginia University and community groups are joining efforts to discuss the Morgantown area’s approach to combatting the opioid epidemic.                                                    

The WVU School of Public HealthMilan Puskar Health Right, the Monongalia County Health DepartmentWVU Collegiate Recovery Program, and WVU Student Government Association will host a November 16 community screening of the Netflix original short documentary “Heroin(e),” followed by a moderated panel discussion and audience Q&A. West Virginia Public Broadcasting is supporting the event.

The screening will begin at 6 p.m. at The Metropolitan Theatre on High Street in downtown Morgantown. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

“Heroin(e)” follows three women in Huntington as they fight the opioid epidemic in a city with an overdose rate 10 times the national average. The film was directed by Peabody award-winning filmmaker Elaine McMillion Sheldon, a West Virginia native and WVU alumna.

Following the screening, School of Public Health Dean Jeffrey Coben, MD, will moderate a panel discussion with WVU representatives and local professionals currently working to address the opiate issue in the Morgantown area. Panelists include Laura Jones, director of Milan Puskar Health Right; James Berry, DO, WVU associate professor and director of addictions and medical director at the WVU Medicine Chestnut Ridge Center; Dr. Cathy Yura, director of the WVU Collegiate Recovery Program; Edward Preston, Chief of Police in Morgantown; and Sheldon.

Audience members will have an opportunity to ask questions as well.

“Heroin(e)” was produced in partnership with The Center for Investigative Reporting through the Glassbreaker Films initiative to support female filmmakers, made possible with support from the Helen Gurley Brown Foundation. The film premiered at the 2017 Telluride Film Festival and has been shortlisted for a Cinema Eye Award.

CONTACT: Kimberly Becker
WVU School of Public Health, Director of Marketing and Communications
304.293.1699; kimberly.becker@hsc.wvu.edu

Read this official release and others on WVU Today.

  • NIOSH director's opioid lecture now on YouTube

    NIOSH director's opioid lecture now on YouTube

    If you weren't able to join the WVU School of Public for NIOSH Director Dr. John Howard's presentation on the opioid crisis, you can watch it on YouTube.

    Read More

  • WVU faculty awarded CDC grant to help southern West Virginia communities build healthy futures

    WVU faculty awarded CDC grant to help southern West Virginia communities build healthy futures

    Faculty from WVU Extension Service, WVU College of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences, and WVU School of Public Health and West Virginia Prevention Research Center received a five-year grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to help in Clay and McDowell counties reduce obesity and other chronic diseases related to long-term unhealthy lifestyles.

    Read More

  • Protecting coal miners from black lung disease

    Protecting coal miners from black lung disease

    In a report published by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, WVU School of Public Health researcher Michael McCawley and his colleagues pinpoint shortcomings in how miners’ exposure to respirable coal-mine dust is monitored. Inhaling this dust over time leads to black lung disease.

    Read More