School of Medicine programs make 2019 US News rankings

West Virginia University’s School of Medicine programs appear in the latest rankings of graduate programs by U.S. News and World Report released Tuesday (March 12).

In all, 11 WVU programs gained ground; additionally, 16 were among the top 100, led by Petroleum Engineering at 12th in the nation.

Other top 100 graduate programs were: 

  • College of Education and Human Services: 93
  • Aerospace/Aeronautical/Astronautical Engineering: 58
  • Chemical Engineering: 99
  • Civil Engineering: 89
  • Computer Engineering: 98
  • Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering: 60
  • Law Schools: 100
  • Primary Care Medicine: 48
  • Medical Research: 84
  • Social Work: 70
  • Environmental Law: 74
  • Health Care Law: 76
  • Tax Law: 96

Other programs included in the rankings were:

  • Engineering School: 118
  • Electrical/Electronics/Communications Engineering: 132
  • Mechanical Engineering: 104
  • Public Health: 102
  • Clinical Law Training: 112
  • Intellectual Property Law: 124
  • International Law: 145
  • Trial Advocacy: 159

-WVU-

jb /03/12/19

View the full article from WVU Today

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