Health Sciences Researcher Leads Investigation on Nanoparticle Inhalation Risks from Laser Printer Exposure

Health Sciences Researcher Leads Investigation on Nanoparticle Inhalation Risks from Laser Printer Exposure

Lan Guo, Professor of Occupational and Environmental Health, and her collaborators recently had their research published in the International Journal of Molecular Science. 

The journal article was titled “Integrated Transcriptomics, Metabolomics, and Lipidomics Profiling in Rat Lung, Blood, and Serum for Assessment of Laser Printer-Emitted Nanoparticle Inhalation Exposure-Induced Disease Risks.” 

Lan Guo, PhD

Her collaborators include researchers from Harvard University, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Nanyang Technological University, Nanjing Medical University, Nanyang Environment & Water Research Institute, and the US Consumer Product Safety Commission. 

WVU was appointed to take the lead on the genomic analysis in the collaborative project, leading the research and publishing efforts for the international team in this study. 

Focusing on the risks of laser printer emitted nanoparticles (PEPs) through inhalation, the team documented disease risks including adverse cardiovascular dysfunction, metabolic syndrome and neural disorders in both rat lung and blood during exposure. PEPs were also shown to induce genomic changes linked to diabetes, congenital defects, auto-recessive disorders, physical deformation and carcinogenesis. 

The article noted that to the best of their knowledge “this is the first study to integrate in vivo, transcriptomics, metabolomics, and lipidomics to assess PEPs inhalation exposure-induced disease risks using a rat model.”

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