Attend a Special Campus Conversation on WVU Health Sciences Culture June 18

Attend a Special Campus Conversation on WVU Health Sciences Culture June 18

Mark your calendars for an upcoming WVU Health Sciences Center Campus Conversation on campus culture:

When: Tuesday, June 18 – noon to 1 p.m.
Where: Room 1905 HSC North

 Ice cream will be available for participants, and the event will be webcast live at hsc.wvu.edu/live-feed for those who are unable to attend. Supervisors are encouraged to allow their staff to attend or view the discussion as long as their operational needs permit.
 
Clay Marsh, M.D., vice president and executive dean for Health Sciences, and Cris DeBord, vice president of Talent and Culture, will co-facilitate the conversations.
 
The discussion will focus on the aggregate results from the 2018 WVU Culture Survey, year-over-year changes from previous surveys, the HSC WVU Culture Survey results and initiatives put in place by the University and HSC to move our culture forward.
 
RSVPs are requested, but not required. Email campusconversations@mail.wvu.edu to register. Questions may be submitted before the event to campusconversations@mail.wvu.edu.

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