Clinical Trials

West Virginia University Cancer Institute's Clinical Research Unit (CRU) is dedicated to providing the services and expertise that investigators need to conduct clinical trials and expand the growing body of biomedical knowledge. We offer a wide range of administrative and budgetary services to both clinical investigators and private industry. Because West Virginia University is the state's primary research institution, the CRU physicians represent a comprehensive range of specializations. Our staff has a sterling reputation for excellent patient care as well as timely delivery of valid and reliable data. Unlike many other academic health centers, West Virginia University provides primary care services to a large, stable population of rural patients. WVU also provides secondary and tertiary care. Our patient population ensures a high degree of follow-up care and study completion that many other clinical trials facilities cannot offer. Clinical trials are conducted at the West Virginia University Cancer Institute and the Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center (HSC) at West Virginia University in Morgantown.

Resources

Current News

  • WVU researchers pursue blood test for colorectal cancer

    WVU researchers pursue blood test for colorectal cancer

    Researchers at the West Virginia University Cancer Institute are evaluating a first-of-its-kind blood test for detecting colorectal cancer. Their findings may help propel the test toward inclusion in the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force’s recommendations for colorectal cancer screening.  

    Read More

  • WVU oncologist researches new treatment for cervical and vaginal cancers

    WVU oncologist researches new treatment for cervical and vaginal cancers

    Cervical cancer can be insidious. Changes to the cervix are often detected with a pap smear, but for those with limited access to health care, cervical and vaginal cancers can go unnoticed for years—silently growing, spreading and invading other organs—and by the time they’re detected, they may be so advanced that the patient’s prognosis is poor and her treatment options few. 

    Read More

  • WVU oncologist researches new treatment for cervical and vaginal cancers

    Cervical cancer can be insidious. Changes to the cervix are often detected with a pap smear, but for those with limited access to health care, cervical and vaginal cancers can go unnoticed for years—silently growing, spreading and invading other organs—and by the time they’re detected, they may be so advanced that the patient’s prognosis is poor and her treatment options few. Valerie Galvan Turner, a gynecologic oncologist at the West Virginia University Cancer Institute, has opened a randomized clinical trial to assess whether a novel supplemental treatment can help chemotherapy and radiation fight these dangerous forms of cancer better.

    Read More